Meet Nynne & Clara, the green entrepreneurs and founders of Komposten!

Clara and Nynne are two special human beings. They are passionate about spreading awareness of the balance on planet earth, while actively healing our soil by Bokashi-composting organic waste.  

 Photo by Birna Schram

Photo by Birna Schram

In today´s world, where fast pace is the norm, giving attention to our living systems are more important than ever. I had the pleasure of speaking with two strong women who have dedicated their energy to help our earth. They have developed a method where you have the opportunity to help our living systems to thrive in balance with us, human beings. Enjoy!

What is Komposten?

“In Komposten we are dreaming of spreading the method of Bokashi-composting, thus ensuring a sustainable recycling of our resources. Our Kaospilot pilot project in 2017 meant new rules in the Ministry of Food,- and Environment. The new rule allows for small community composting, including apartment complexes, allotment garden communities, small islands, institutions and festivals. Since the new rule we have written a report about Bokashi compost, the effect in climate change, environmental politics and our pilot project. We’ve executed a project at NorthSide festival and implemented Bokashi-systems both in a shared office space and a school, and we are now ready to share the knowledge we have gained. Therefor we are publishing guides to support anyone interested in implementing Bokashi-composting.”

And what is Bokashi?

“Bokashi is a combination of microbes that we add to organic waste to start a magical fermentation process. Under airtight (anaerobic) conditions, the microbes ferment all organic waste in just two weeks. This process means that there will be no emission of methane in the process, making it both the most sustainable and the most effective composting method.”

 Photo by Birna Schram

Photo by Birna Schram

Why is it important to you that we start doing bokashi composting?

“As soon as organic matter is added to our soil, it adds to creating the top-layer called humus, the one without chickpeas, that is, says Nynne with a big smile on her face. Humus is the world’s best CO2-storage. Similar to trees, humus eats CO2 and creates food for plants and clean air. Tress only eat 1,8 kg CO2 per kg of tree, where humus eats 2,18 kg CO2 per kg humus. While all organic matter will add to creating humus, all other ways of breaking down food to soil, including biogas, heat compost and garden compost, will emission a lot of CO2 and some methane in process. When using Bokashi only a little bit of CO2 and no methane is created.

Bokashi is also capable of breaking down meat,- and dairy products, bread and citrus fruits and all the nutrition will go back to the soil either as solid compost or liquid fertilizer. “

“All the people we have had involved in our project have been excited to be part of it and see a big value in Bokashi composting. We feel like we are in a time of green consciousness, which Bokashi compost definitely supports.”

What is the impact people are contributing to earth with, when they do bokashi composting?

“Besides having a very direct and big effect by contributing to the storage of CO2 in the soil, there is also a potential for replacing chemicals and pesticides. Because by adding Bokashi-compost to the soil, the plants grow so strong that they can fight off diseases by themselves and maintain a good growth without any artificial fertilizers. We also believe that when we sort and compost our organic waste, we get a larger awareness of the huge ecosystems we are part of, and start being more conscious in general. “

 Photo by Birna Schram

Photo by Birna Schram

How have people reacted when starting to do bokashi composting?

“All the people we have had involved in our project have been excited to be part of it and see a big value in Bokashi composting. We feel like we are in a time of green consciousness, which Bokashi compost definitely supports.”

What will people be surprised by when starting this process themselves?

“How easy it is, how little it smells and how visible the results are.”

“We believe that the best way to make something grow is to set it free, and the people are the best possible facilitators of change that we could imagine. “

I know you are leaving Komposten now, and that you have a farewell party tomorrow at greencubator in Nørrebro. What do you want to leave this initiative with? What are your thoughts about giving the power to the people?

“We feel like this arks a moving of the knowledge from our heads to everyone else. With the release of the guides our aim is to make Bokashi-compost as independent of us as possible - so that the movement we have started will spread far beyond our reach. 

We believe that the best way to make something grow is to set it free, and the people are the best possible facilitators of change that we could imagine. “

 Photo by Birna Schram

Photo by Birna Schram

What are your dreams for the future?

“Personally, we are currently exploring what new adventures will continue to challenge us, expand our minds and support us in creating meaningful lives. 

For Bokashi-compost we dream of every courtyard, restaurant and institution having their own Bokashi-systems. Long-term we hope that politics will allow for a more sustainable use of our resources. We hope that farmers to a larger degree will be able to use Bokashi-compost and thereby limiting climate change, saving our ground water from pesticides and being able to produce even during more extreme weather conditions. “

Anything else you would like to add?

“The event on Saturday is held at Greencubator, Nørreborgade 20. The first lucky people will be able to receive Bokashi start-kits and there will be ´delish´ goods from Aarstiderne. After the weekend the guides will be available at www.komposten.info where our report is also available, if one wants to know more. 

Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1118208575011453/

Article by: www.rewildstudio.com

All our articles are with content that connects us more with nature in different ways. Enjoy and remember to breath!

“Of course nature speaks. Aren’t you listening?”

This was the reply from Sol, soon to be 3 years old when her father asked her what she believed nature would say if it could speak.

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Eno Stabell is 28 years old and "a Student of Life" as he poetically puts it. He is living in Århus with his partner, Lykkeluna and their daughter Sol. 

I asked him about his thoughts on nature and how he thinks his daughter is connected with it.

Why is it important to you to connect your child with nature?

“Nature is everywhere. It's within and without, small and big, gross and subtle. It is the rhythm and constant change of life its self. My daughter is part of this nature as much as my self, only she lives it so much more natural than me. My daughter connects me to nature. I thank her for that!”

How do you connect your child with nature in the city?

“Sol sees the beauty and thereby nature in everything. I try to support that connection by staying open and curious about the surroundings and look for beauty in everything. Humans, cars, spiders, and grass. It's all nature if we choose to see it in that way.”

What does your child like the most by being out in nature?

“I wish Sol could say this her self because it's hard to read her mind. But my assumption is that she feels like home. The presence, diversity, and wonder which nature provides, leave space for her to get to know her self and thereby feel that she belongs in the world.“

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 What is the biggest experience your child has had in nature?

“Being born, I guess.”

Where is your child’s favorite place in nature?

"In her mother's arms."

 What advise would you give parents that live in a city and wants to connect their children more with nature?

“Don't separate your self from nature. You are nature and nature, are you. We are connected also living in the city. Let nature show it's self instead of searching for an illusion of what nature is. Just let your children show you what nature is. It's that easy.”

What would you like your child to learn about nature?

“We are all One. In the deep waste web of life, we are all and everything connected.”

What would you like me to ask you, that I haven’t asked you yet?

“What is nature? Thats a good question. Well worth exploring with my child.”

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How can we connect our children with nature while living in a city?

“We brought both girls to Sweden, where we slept in tents in the woods. The eldest was two years old and the youngest three months. These were the most relaxing days of our summer vacation”

 Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

Line Dannemann is twenty eight years old and lives in Copenhagen with her boyfriend and their two kids.

It is a challenge for many people living in cities to stay connected with nature and get the benefits of it. In the past decade, the benefits of connecting to nature have been well documented in numerous scientific research studies and publications. Collectively, this body of research shows that children’s social, psychological, academic and physical health is positively impacted when they have daily contact with nature. 

I asked Line about her thoughts around how we can help our children be connected with nature while living in cities, what advice she would give other parents, and what her daughter believes nature would tell us if it could speak.

 Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

Why is it important for you to connect your children with nature?

"My partner and I were both raised in an environment where most days were spend outside.  This has obviously affected our love for the outdoor living and for nature. Unfortunately, we can’t offer our children the same environment at the moment, as we live and work in the city. When we find the time to go out in nature we feel that we connect with our children on a different level. Not connecting by sitting on the couch watching a movie, cuddling – witch also can be nice. But we connect over the simple things like lying on a pillow of moss inhaling the magical smell of the forest or over a certain shape of a stone on the beach."

"One of the most important things we have observed when we are away from the city and stay in the countryside is how our children get much more creative."

For every day we spent outside their creativity unfolds magnificently.  Their physical activity and motor control also get challenged which is so important for their health and development. As we both are educated as physiotherapists we know for a fact that so many children today have undeveloped motor skills, that is also why we feel so strongly about getting outside."

 Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

How do you connect your children with nature in the city?

“To be honest, I have to admit that it is quite difficult. Me and my boyfriend’s big dream is to watch our small girls grow up in nature, go on adventures together, and live the simple life. We are not able to do that at the moment. Instead, we go on small adventures almost every weekend, such as a trip to the forest or the countryside.

When we arrive back in the city, we have often brought a piece of nature with us home. For example, a flower bouquet, branches with buds which we together watch sprout at home in the living room, or we collect rocks, shells, and seaweed by the beach that we decorate our balcony with. We also grow small plants inside the apartment. My oldest daughter thinks that it’s cozy to see her little plants sprout and become vegetables. She follows the process patiently and says that her small sprouts will become radishes and thyme which she will eat when it’s summer.”

What do your children like the most by being out in nature?

“The eldest one loves when she can find something edible. Sorrel, beech leaves, wild raspberries, blueberries, blackberries are some of her favorites. It's also a sport for her to find mushrooms and she's pretty good at it. At the age of two, she could find the little orange-angled chanterelles, and did not confuse them with other mushrooms.”

How did your child answer; What do you think nature would tell us if it could speak?
“Strawberry cake, mushrooms, nuts, Easter eggs, sand, water, and blueberries!

 Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

Photo: Matias Løye Hejl

What is the biggest experience your children have had in nature?

“We brought both girls to Sweden, where we slept in tents in the woods. The eldest was two years and the youngest three months. These were the most relaxing days of our summer vacation. We didn’t do anything other than just being in and enjoying nature. We would smell the forest floor, find chanterelles, make a fire, and bathe in a forest lake. There was no stress and we could especially sense on our "big" girl that she was more happy and free. She did not cry once and I think she could feel that we were more present and relaxed.”

What advice would you give parents that live in a city and want to connect their children more with nature?

"Try to plant something together. Watch the sprouts grow. It does not require a balcony; just a window with light. It’s a really nice thing to do together and opens up for many good talks"

What would you like your children to learn about nature?

"About how we can take better care of it.  It may be hard to teach a three years old (and impossible to teach one who’s nine months), but I think the talk is so important to our future."

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